Live Tiny, Live Well

The Relationship Between Tiny Homes and Mental Health


May is mental health awareness month.  It’s a time to reflect, educate, and heal.  Good mental health is conducive to positive relationships, productivity, and improved self worth.  As the month creeps on, we thought we’d note some of the very real ways people utilize tiny homes to improve their mental health.

If you’re using a tiny as your full-time home or vacation home…

Whether you’re living in your tiny year-round or part-time, you can reap the mental health benefits of minimalism and nature.

RV certified tiny homes and accessory dwelling unit

 Minimalist Living

Clutter creates anxiety.  Imagine walking into your favorite store.  All of the best products are there, but there’s still a calming sense of neatness.  None of the items are crowded in, but instead, placed in a spot of honor where it will be seen and used the most.  Like your favorite store, your possessions shouldn’t be stuffed inside, but instead, put in a place of care where they will be most cherished.  Be intentional about what you surround yourself with.  As author Gretchen Rubin says, “Outer order contributes to inner calm.”  Your home should contain everything you want and nothing you don’t.  

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Closer to outdoor space

Many people choose to put their tiny homes within nature because of their mobility and off-grid capabilities.  According to the American Psychological Association, “Exposure to nature has been linked to a host of benefits, including improved attention, lower stress, better mood, reduced risk of psychiatric disorders and even upticks in empathy and cooperation.”  With all of the known benefits, why wouldn’t you park your tiny in a beautiful, scenic location when possible?

 If you’re using a tiny as a backyard studio…

Use your tiny home as a backyard office or guest suite to relieve anxiety and promote wellness.  Tiny homes used as ADUs are the perfect way to add more space to your property without the hassle of construction.

home office

 Separation from work and home

More Americans are working remotely than ever.  Sometimes it starts to feel more like you’re living at work than working from home (never a good thing).  Consider adding a tiny home to your backyard to either use as your office or as an escape from your office.  The separation of space for work and family life is what’s most important.  According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, “An unconnected space helps ensure quiet and tucks away the nagging ephemera of office life—to-do lists, computers, cords—when you’re off the clock.”

32' 1 level tiny home on wheels

Bring loved ones closer

Humans crave familial interaction.  A Harvard study found that, “Close relationships, more than money or fame, are what keep people happy throughout their lives.”  Bringing family members closer together can be beneficial to everyone’s well being.  It’s easier to care for older relatives nearby, you have a trustworthy hand to help you at all times, and a familiar face right out your door.  

There are a lot of benefits to going tiny.  One of the most important aspects is how it positively impacts mental health.  Find serenity in simplicity, reconnect with nature, create peace within your life, and hold the ones you love close.  Get tranquility delivered to you in the form of a tiny home. 

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